Author Topic: Sleeping bags  (Read 531 times)

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Offline boskone

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2021, 07:45:40 PM »
Not sure the wool blanket I have would be much lighter than the bag/bivy.
Do some back-yard testing, maybe, and figure out when you actually need the blanket; leave it out when it's not needed, strap it to the top or bottom when it is.

Offline Nyte

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2021, 08:01:43 PM »
Not sure the wool blanket I have would be much lighter than the bag/bivy.
Do some back-yard testing, maybe, and figure out when you actually need the blanket; leave it out when it's not needed, strap it to the top or bottom when it is.

Yeah, the plan is hopefully this coming weekend I'm going to go do a shakedown camp.  See what works and what doesn't, what seems extra.

Offline Moab

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #22 on: August 11, 2021, 11:01:10 AM »
Look at dridown from kelty. Kelty makes some of the most reasonably priced down bags. I have 0f bags i picked up for $150 a piece on sale. Once a year they put everything on sale. To accommodate there new designs for the coming year. Mine are just normal down. That i keep inside of the mss bivy. I need to upgrade to dridown tho.

Down is way lighter. And with the new dridown types of down alot less likely to absorb moisture. Not waterproof. But better than plain down.

I used the mss before this. And still have 2 of them. That are part of my car kits now. Way to heavy to hump. While the keltys are not ultra light. They are about half the weight of the mss. For just a bit more money. They also store way way smaller.

Lastly, sleeping bag ratings are basically based on this will keep you from freezing to death at this given temp. Not "you will be comfortable at this given temp". And there is no industry standard. Iirc. So buy well below what you need. I bought 0f with the idea that it would keep me warm in the 20f to 30f range.

Oh. And dont sleep naked. Thats either a fallacy or something your pervy boy scout leader came up with.  Youd be surprised how many people think sleeping naked will make you warmer than if you slept in layers.
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Offline Nyte

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2021, 12:40:58 PM »
Look at dridown from kelty. Kelty makes some of the most reasonably priced down bags. I have 0f bags i picked up for $150 a piece on sale. Once a year they put everything on sale. To accommodate there new designs for the coming year. Mine are just normal down. That i keep inside of the mss bivy. I need to upgrade to dridown tho.

Down is way lighter. And with the new dridown types of down alot less likely to absorb moisture. Not waterproof. But better than plain down.

I used the mss before this. And still have 2 of them. That are part of my car kits now. Way to heavy to hump. While the keltys are not ultra light. They are about half the weight of the mss. For just a bit more money. They also store way way smaller.

Lastly, sleeping bag ratings are basically based on this will keep you from freezing to death at this given temp. Not "you will be comfortable at this given temp". And there is no industry standard. Iirc. So buy well below what you need. I bought 0f with the idea that it would keep me warm in the 20f to 30f range.

Oh. And dont sleep naked. Thats either a fallacy or something your pervy boy scout leader came up with.  Youd be surprised how many people think sleeping naked will make you warmer than if you slept in layers.

Yeah, I'm definitely transitioning to down.  Yeah, sleeping naked doesn't equal extra warmth, like you I don't know where that came from, unless of course your clothes are all wet, then yeah, get out of them to get warm.  I tend to sleep hot, so unless it's cold, I don't tend to sleep in a lot, but I'm also less in/under my bag then.  I'm actually looking at quilts, like the ones from Enlightened Equipment, just may have to save up a little first.

Offline Moab

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2021, 02:35:36 PM »
Look at dridown from kelty. Kelty makes some of the most reasonably priced down bags. I have 0f bags i picked up for $150 a piece on sale. Once a year they put everything on sale. To accommodate there new designs for the coming year. Mine are just normal down. That i keep inside of the mss bivy. I need to upgrade to dridown tho.

Down is way lighter. And with the new dridown types of down alot less likely to absorb moisture. Not waterproof. But better than plain down.

I used the mss before this. And still have 2 of them. That are part of my car kits now. Way to heavy to hump. While the keltys are not ultra light. They are about half the weight of the mss. For just a bit more money. They also store way way smaller.

Lastly, sleeping bag ratings are basically based on this will keep you from freezing to death at this given temp. Not "you will be comfortable at this given temp". And there is no industry standard. Iirc. So buy well below what you need. I bought 0f with the idea that it would keep me warm in the 20f to 30f range.

Oh. And dont sleep naked. Thats either a fallacy or something your pervy boy scout leader came up with.  Youd be surprised how many people think sleeping naked will make you warmer than if you slept in layers.

Yeah, I'm definitely transitioning to down.  Yeah, sleeping naked doesn't equal extra warmth, like you I don't know where that came from, unless of course your clothes are all wet, then yeah, get out of them to get warm.  I tend to sleep hot, so unless it's cold, I don't tend to sleep in a lot, but I'm also less in/under my bag then.  I'm actually looking at quilts, like the ones from Enlightened Equipment, just may have to save up a little first.

Quilts are lighter. Thats a good thing.

Ya. I sleep hot too. But in extreme cold extra layers can help the rating of your bag.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

Offline Nyte

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2021, 02:42:17 PM »
Look at dridown from kelty. Kelty makes some of the most reasonably priced down bags. I have 0f bags i picked up for $150 a piece on sale. Once a year they put everything on sale. To accommodate there new designs for the coming year. Mine are just normal down. That i keep inside of the mss bivy. I need to upgrade to dridown tho.

Down is way lighter. And with the new dridown types of down alot less likely to absorb moisture. Not waterproof. But better than plain down.

I used the mss before this. And still have 2 of them. That are part of my car kits now. Way to heavy to hump. While the keltys are not ultra light. They are about half the weight of the mss. For just a bit more money. They also store way way smaller.

Lastly, sleeping bag ratings are basically based on this will keep you from freezing to death at this given temp. Not "you will be comfortable at this given temp". And there is no industry standard. Iirc. So buy well below what you need. I bought 0f with the idea that it would keep me warm in the 20f to 30f range.

Oh. And dont sleep naked. Thats either a fallacy or something your pervy boy scout leader came up with.  Youd be surprised how many people think sleeping naked will make you warmer than if you slept in layers.

Yeah, I'm definitely transitioning to down.  Yeah, sleeping naked doesn't equal extra warmth, like you I don't know where that came from, unless of course your clothes are all wet, then yeah, get out of them to get warm.  I tend to sleep hot, so unless it's cold, I don't tend to sleep in a lot, but I'm also less in/under my bag then.  I'm actually looking at quilts, like the ones from Enlightened Equipment, just may have to save up a little first.

Quilts are lighter. Thats a good thing.

Ya. I sleep hot too. But in extreme cold extra layers can help the rating of your bag.

Agreed.  I've taken the patrol bag below freezing with layers.  Not a lot below, and it wasn't the most comfortable night, but I got enough sleep.

Offline RonnyRonin

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2021, 09:46:16 PM »
The "sleep naked" thing I hear most often from Marines, so I tend to blame them for starting it. My theory is they (like most militaries) still wear cotton heavy clothes (50% currently) and don't trust their people to be able to tell when their clothes are too wet to sleep in so decided to lowest-common-denominator their sleeping instructions rather than try to train better practices. 

With modern synthetic clothing not only does sleeping in your clothing provide extra warmth, but does the important job of chasing residual moisture out so you wake up with nice dry layers ready to face the day without the need to change. In the last few years I've even started to commit the ultimate heresy of not even bothering to change my socks for multiday trips; with a good sleep system they are dry every morning.
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Offline Nyte

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2021, 10:23:20 PM »
That seems as reasonable explanation as any, and makes some good sense.  I also find that with good wool socks, leaving them on for several days in the field has no ill effects.  I still carry an extra pair though.

Offline boskone

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2021, 10:44:41 PM »
I split the difference, and carry sleeping clothes appropriate to the circumstances.  Summer is a t-shirt, and mesh shorts; but (topically) in winter something like thick socks, sweat pants, and a warm shirt.

The sleeping clothes only get worn for sleeping; putting them on is the last thing I do in the evening, and swapping back to day clothes is the second thing I do in the morning (after putting my contacts back in).

That does two things, IMO: ensures I have nice clean clothes to sleep in (I hate sleeping in 'greasy' clothing), and gives my other clothes a chance to air out/dry/whatever.  And, secondarily, in the interim between I can often at least wipe down with a baby wipe or something.

Offline Moab

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2021, 11:44:02 PM »
The "sleep naked" thing I hear most often from Marines, so I tend to blame them for starting it. My theory is they (like most militaries) still wear cotton heavy clothes (50% currently) and don't trust their people to be able to tell when their clothes are too wet to sleep in so decided to lowest-common-denominator their sleeping instructions rather than try to train better practices. 

With modern synthetic clothing not only does sleeping in your clothing provide extra warmth, but does the important job of chasing residual moisture out so you wake up with nice dry layers ready to face the day without the need to change. In the last few years I've even started to commit the ultimate heresy of not even bothering to change my socks for multiday trips; with a good sleep system they are dry every morning.

I never heard that in the entire time i was in the Marine Corps. But i did hear it alot on the survival forums. Like alot of dudes arguing that it was somehow a proven fact. Lmao.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

Offline Tony D Tiger

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2021, 07:39:55 AM »
The "sleep naked" thing I hear most often from Marines, so I tend to blame them for starting it. My theory is they (like most militaries) still wear cotton heavy clothes (50% currently) and don't trust their people to be able to tell when their clothes are too wet to sleep in so decided to lowest-common-denominator their sleeping instructions rather than try to train better practices. 

With modern synthetic clothing not only does sleeping in your clothing provide extra warmth, but does the important job of chasing residual moisture out so you wake up with nice dry layers ready to face the day without the need to change. In the last few years I've even started to commit the ultimate heresy of not even bothering to change my socks for multiday trips; with a good sleep system they are dry every morning.

I never heard that in the entire time i was in the Marine Corps. But i did hear it alot on the survival forums. Like alot of dudes arguing that it was somehow a proven fact. Lmao.
a USMC buddy of mine claims the Corps' favorite saying is "Travel light; freeze at night." :shades:

Offline Moab

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Re: Sleeping bags
« Reply #31 on: August 12, 2021, 12:45:19 PM »
The "sleep naked" thing I hear most often from Marines, so I tend to blame them for starting it. My theory is they (like most militaries) still wear cotton heavy clothes (50% currently) and don't trust their people to be able to tell when their clothes are too wet to sleep in so decided to lowest-common-denominator their sleeping instructions rather than try to train better practices. 

With modern synthetic clothing not only does sleeping in your clothing provide extra warmth, but does the important job of chasing residual moisture out so you wake up with nice dry layers ready to face the day without the need to change. In the last few years I've even started to commit the ultimate heresy of not even bothering to change my socks for multiday trips; with a good sleep system they are dry every morning.

I never heard that in the entire time i was in the Marine Corps. But i did hear it alot on the survival forums. Like alot of dudes arguing that it was somehow a proven fact. Lmao.
a USMC buddy of mine claims the Corps' favorite saying is "Travel light; freeze at night." :shades:

When i went thru cold weather training at Bridgeport CA. We had no choice but to carry heavy shit. I think that old canvas down bag probably weighed 20lbs! And our wool 20 more.

I think if they measured jarheads thighs in the 80s and compared them to today. They'd be about 6 inches larger around. Lol.

The funny part was anyone with a large alice pack was considered a baddass. I was in a STA platoon. Sort of recon on the battalion level. So we got a choice of gear. But really they just carried more crap. And were more miserable. ;)

Looking back now. All of our gear was crap. We had cast iron pot bellied stoves in our main tents at basecamp. Had to steal extra axes from supply to cut wood. We humped in mickey mouse boots. And carried canvas shelter halves with wooden tent stakes. And jute cord to put them up with.

Maybe im mistaken and i served during the the revolutionary war. Lol. ;) did they have snow caves at valley forge?

But at 13,000ft it was the hardest hiking ive ever done. With the most amount of weight.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

 

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