Author Topic: Best Quality Bandaids?  (Read 699 times)

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Offline Crosscut

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2021, 04:45:31 AM »
I go with the cloth Band-Aids. For me, plastic ones peel off way too fast, and aren't very flexible. I also have yet to find a brand where the paper sleeves don't eventually deteriorate.

It may seem totally over the top, but a little dab of super glue works wonders. I used to think putting super glue on a cut was like the old "tampon in a gunshot wound," trope, but a few years working in a kitchen made a believer out of me.

What about that Liquid Bandaid stuff (I think the brand is called New Skin) ?

I saw that in the store last weekend while buying bandaids and mentally blew it off. But now I'm thinking I should try it.

Thanks for bringing it up and making me rethink it.

Works good for scratches on kids until it dries and they start picking at it anyway.   Dog feet (paw pads) too, I keep two bottles with one labeled just for them since the applicator usually gets sand/dirt on it between applications.  If there's a flap of pad hanging you can sometimes use this to 'glue' it back down. 

Offline 12_Gauge_Chimp

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2021, 09:38:13 PM »
I go with the cloth Band-Aids. For me, plastic ones peel off way too fast, and aren't very flexible. I also have yet to find a brand where the paper sleeves don't eventually deteriorate.

It may seem totally over the top, but a little dab of super glue works wonders. I used to think putting super glue on a cut was like the old "tampon in a gunshot wound," trope, but a few years working in a kitchen made a believer out of me.

What about that Liquid Bandaid stuff (I think the brand is called New Skin) ?

I saw that in the store last weekend while buying bandaids and mentally blew it off. But now I'm thinking I should try it.

Thanks for bringing it up and making me rethink it.

No problem.

I usually tend to use it whenever I've got a cut on my fingers and normal bandages won't stay put.

Offline Anianna

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2022, 05:11:31 PM »
Some fellow allergy and sensitive skin sufferers have recommended hydrocolloid bandages, but I saw that some people in the reviews of these had allergic reactions while others love them.  So I bought two brands; Bandaid Hydro Seal and Welly Kicker Sticker and I have applied one to each arm to test how I respond to them.

These were originally marketed towards blister and acne treatment, so they can be odd sizes and shapes for wound care use.  I find the Welly Kicker Sticker to be a decent size for wound care compared to typical bandaids.  The ones from Bandaid brand seem to be a bit to narrow or a bit too wide.  I bought the narrow size because they're a bit cheaper per use and they'll be sufficient for small cuts. 

The hydrocolloid gel is what adheres the bandage to the skin and provides healing conditions, so there is no need for antiseptic or adhesives. 

Initial thoughts:  The Bandaid brand seems to have better edge adhesion.  The Welly one is a better size. They have a sort of cooling feel against the skin.  As of 20 minutes wearing them, neither is producing a skin reaction.  These might be an option for me.
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Offline Crosscut

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2022, 05:57:23 AM »
I found a small stash of (1980's?) Johnson and Johnson band aids in the medicine cabinet at the cabin over the holidays, the kind with the red string to help open the package.  The outer packaging  feels and looks like wax paper with folded ends and still sealed like they were new.  30 or more years old maybe and kept in a non-climate controlled environment the whole time.  Stuck one in my pocket and brought it home so I can test it the next time I get a cut.

Offline NapalmMan67

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2022, 03:37:39 PM »
I found a small stash of (1980's?) Johnson and Johnson band aids in the medicine cabinet at the cabin over the holidays, the kind with the red string to help open the package.  The outer packaging  feels and looks like wax paper with folded ends and still sealed like they were new.  30 or more years old maybe and kept in a non-climate controlled environment the whole time.  Stuck one in my pocket and brought it home so I can test it the next time I get a cut. 

Classic!  I remember those pull string packages from the early '70s while growing up.  I think they discoed the pull string in the early 90s.
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Offline Anianna

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Re: Best Quality Bandaids?
« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2022, 04:05:13 PM »
Update on the hydrocolloid bandages:

Both brands staid on for 24 hours without skin problems.  I even put lotion on my arms with them there (I forgot about them) and that didn't budge them.  The Welly brand one took off hair when I removed it.  Otherwise, they were not painful to remove. 

These are designed to stay on and not be replaced daily as other types of bandages should be.  The directions say to leave them on until they come loose and they were definitely not loose at the 24 hour mark. 

I think these are a viable option if you tolerate them.  I recommend testing one before you use it for injury, just in case you have a sensitivity.  I now have more options for bandages for my intolerant skin and I'm comfortable recommending these to others with sensitive skin.
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