Cabin/Bunkhouse plans Anyone interested?

Started by superduder, August 10, 2023, 11:09:24 AM

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superduder

The E.F.Hodgson houses are something I fell in love with.
The fact that you could go as far as to order your bedrooms, bathrooms,
kitchen complete with cabinetry, appliances, fixtures permanently mounted to the structure
In an easy to assemble kit, or flat pack form, just appeals to me.
"I get it, I get it... But it's Still a pain in the ass."
Shawn Kelly

superduder

Another example of old plans that can be used for (at least) temporary shelter.
I hate the reason these plans had to be made (tuberculosis) but am glad that they exist, and were archived.
From "The Boy Mechanic Book 3" 1919
Link to Archive (dot) org for pdf
https://archive.org/details/boymechanic0003unse
"I get it, I get it... But it's Still a pain in the ass."
Shawn Kelly

majorhavoc

Quote from: superduder on December 10, 2023, 12:51:39 AMAnother example of old plans that can be used for (at least) temporary shelter.
I hate the reason these plans had to be made (tuberculosis) but am glad that they exist, and were archived.
From "The Boy Mechanic Book 3" 1919
Link to Archive (dot) org for pdf
https://archive.org/details/boymechanic0003unse
Tuberculosis.  Wow.  That's really a sign of those times, isn't it?  That whole Boy Mechanic book series is fascinating from an historical perspective.  There's a reserach project and master's thesis in there somewhere.

From what I can see of the construction details, that business about it being built in sections and easily moved around and assembled by two men in 30 minutes seems somewhat ... uh ... fanciful

QuoteThe cottage is constructed in sections and can be assembled or dismantled in 30 minutes.  The sections are not so heavy but that they can be handled with ease by two men.  There are seven sections, namely, the floor, two sides, two ends and two roof sections.  If the cottage is to be moved a short distance it can be loaded into an ordinary dray assembled.

The 10 x 5 foot floor section with double sills and decking material alone would quite a task for two men to move around.  Certainly not with "ease".  I bet those roof sections weigh even more.  I had to look up "dray", lol.

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Moab

Quote from: superduder on September 05, 2023, 10:44:46 AMAnd another idea, aside from the fact that it's almost 30ft high,
I thought this would work for a singe occupancy cabin at the B.O.L.
it's an 10X12 (with porch 8X10 living area) with possible vehicle storage underneath.

It would also have 400-800W of solar on the roof, in ground water storage/rain catchment,
and camper appliances (stove, sink, fridge, lighting, shower, toilet) along with dinette and bunk,
setup like the book "travel trailer homesteading for under $5K by Brian Kelling (.pdf or link to Archive (dot) org included)
pdf of book mentioned
This with a steeper roof and built for snow load. Would be an excellent "leave it and forget it" for northern climates. Number one it's snow proof and number two bear proof. If you made the stairs removable.

I also like the idea of the bottom floor being used as a workshop or temp sleeping area for additional guests.

The A frame on top would probably be a better idea than a shed roof for snow load. But I like the shed roof for way more interior space, visibility and looks.

Maybe a solid modified version of this could be built atop a shipping container. Using the ground floor shipping container for food and equipment storage.  Would give you more security. And if you built the upper level the same size as a shipping container would give you more living space. Maybe even build a covered deck off the top level. Would give you more living use as well.

Additionally, I like the height. Depending on location this could give you more visibilty to monitor your property/egress/ingress. Or perhaps crops and animals too.

Additional shipping containers could store vehicles better too. At least from the weather. I don't know of any failsafe security options for a shipping container. That couldn't be defeated with a cordless angle grinder. I guess if you buried it in a hillside. You'd only have the door to contend with. But still. It seems like an angle grinder could defeat almost any solution. This is why I no longer invest in safes for security issues. And even the "affirdable" fireproof ones are not rated for very long in a fire.

Great posts man. Keep it up.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

superduder

The slant roof design is definitely meant for dryer climates (here in AZ for example).
The shipping container base idea never really occurred to me, despite my love of "The best trailer park in the world"
The container (20-40ft) could also be partially (10-15ft) buried on end for an added cellar,
or protection for water storage tanks, and/or electrics to save them from rodents.
and the partially buried part would add stability in more windy areas... again AZ as an example...
Now you've got me scheming again lol. 
"I get it, I get it... But it's Still a pain in the ass."
Shawn Kelly

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