Quick! Pandemic is Raging, Bugin as Long as Possible!

Started by Halfapint, June 07, 2021, 10:01:56 PM

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Halfapint

Let get a little crazy here, lets say there was a pandemic raging. No one knew exactly how long things would last, no idea how it spreads, but there is a blanket shelter in place order instated. You have one day to grab things that you might need to last, lets just say, 3 months. What do you grab?

Ok jokes aside, most of us probably bugged in for a little while, did you learn anything? Did you realize you absolutely loath lentils? What bug in things that you had been planning for did you realize were dumb? Have any bug in wins? Loses? We had a pretty good learning opportunity the last 15-16 months. I'm wanting to know what you learned.

I'll start. The big fail was TP. I usually keep enough on hand for say 6+ months. But after moving into the trailer and space being limited. I honestly completely forgot. We ran out about 3 weeks into the panic buying. I was able to "borrow" some from a neighbor who had about 320 year supply. I have since paid him back but nothing is worse than realizing no one has it, and you're having to take showers after every BM.

Wins, honestly everything else about our plan worked. We had enough food to last us probably to now or beyond. I've bought fresh veggies, and some chicken because for a while it was at rock bottom prices. But other than that, we've been living off what we had. Oh, and bananas, my grandma HAS to have bananas so about every 2 weeks we'd have to get some for her.

What we learned, well we learned a lot of new recepies for things we had. No I did not learn I loathe lentils, I actually like them more than ever.

Tell me your stories.
The original Half gettin sum land thread
https://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=111413

Quote from: SpazzyTell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

boskone

I don't keep quite 6 months of TP, but instead maybe a 4-6 week supply.  I have an open pack, and another in the bottom of the linen closet, and when I open the 'spare' I buy another.  So I weathered the TP panic pretty well.

Similarly, I have perhaps a month's worth of food, though light on the meat.  Canned goods, rice, beans mostly.  I was able to weather the panic buying pretty handily.

I will admit, though, that compared to some areas the 'panic' here was downright sedate.  Shelves were thin, but I think there was only maybe a week or two when they were anything like fully bare.  I might've had to be tolerant (e.g. sub whatever canned greens I could find), but that was really about it.

It did point out some deficiencies I have, though, which is why I took up canning.  Ground beef was a colossal failure, but chicken chunks and chili worked fine.  I'll, er, not bother canning right now; it's too damned hot for that.  But I think I'll try to start a spring/fall canning rotation.

NT2C

For me, I learned that being in a pandemic really wasn't much of a change from my pre-pandemic life.  I was already a prepper, so I had pretty ample resources to see us through (including a case of industrial rolls of TP - though more ammo would have been nice), I didn't get out much because I'm disabled, my two best friends weren't available (one is in Texas dealing with his late mother's estate, the other was away becoming a federal LEO and is now swamped with work) so I had even less reason to go out, and my fully vaccinated wife does all the local grocery shopping.  Honestly, the biggest change for me was having to wear a mask if I went to a store or my doctor's office.
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto

Current Weather in My AO
Current Tracking Info for My Jeep

Lambykins

I never get to be like the cool kids and *bug in*!
I am what is called "A Front Line Worker".
A cashier in a grocery store....
Yeah, kinda funny.

But here's what I learned:
1) People suck.
2) Panicking people suck x 10.
3) Panicking people buy things they have no clue of how to use. Case in point: yeast. We had to put limits on flour, sugar and yeast. But I was CONSTANTLY asked "How do I use this to make bread?" when someone was buying yeast.  ::)
4) My roommate (at the time) and I never ran out of anything. We were both preppers. So, we had good supplies throughout the panic buying.
5) We came close to running out of toilet paper, but we were prepared for that...boxes of borateem, a diaper pail and inexpensive washcloths that we bought in bundles at Family Dollar.

What I learned?
I can make a damn good fake meat patty (what we called a "shamburger") out of black beans, lentils and spices.
I can live quite happily without meat for about a month. For budget and health reasons, I rarely eat meat more than twice a week now.
I learned to never EVER  let anyone not in my immediate household know what I have. I saw other people *bragging* about their supplies and most of them ended up with family and friends and sometimes "friends of friends" casually "dropping by" with excuses and reasons they needed something.
"But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career, skills that make me a nightmare for people like you." Taken

"There is no such thing as a fair fight. Fight dirty EVERY time. Dirty fighters win, fair fighters lose. Every fight is a fight for your life. Fight to win. Fight dirty." My dad

"Am I dangerous? Ask any of my surviving exes..." Me

SCBrian

My experience tends to mirror Lamby's.  I'm considered front line.  I actually ramped up hours during the pandemic.  Though the pay was nice. 
Had the TP, and when it started getting low enough to be concerned didnt have too much trouble finding some.  Just had to shop around.   There were facebook groups that popped up to spot it, but with the numbers on FB, they were pretty useless unless you were VERY close by...  I eye'd the Giant roll in the work bathroom once... lol, but never got that bad...

Quote1) People suck.
Not only do they suck, they are entitled.   :headbang:
I learned I get cabin fever.  Bad. 
I also learned that this leads to irritating the wife.   :o
I learned it sure was nice driving with 80% of the people off the road, and recently I've realized that the 80% taking a break have forgotten how to drive... 


BattleVersion wrote:  "For my Family?...Burn down the world, sure... But, I'm also willing to carry it on my shoulders."

Halfapint

Quote1) People suck.

I work from home. Through I am considered "essential" as well. The wife being a flight attendant was absolutely essential, and the the entitled people suck the most. Luckily she didn't have any problems with pax, but there were some horror stories. There are a bunch of new people on the no fly list and carriers are starting to share data for black listed costumers.
The original Half gettin sum land thread
https://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=111413

Quote from: SpazzyTell ya what... If Zombies attack and the world ends I'll hook tandem toddlers to a plow if it means I'll be able to eat...

airballrad

I've been a full-time remote worker for almost five years, so that was not a change for me. Having three children attending school remotely without much warning was a bit of a challenge, but we are fortunate to have a large enough house that they could spread out a bit and I am tech savvy enough that they did not have too much trouble making it work.

We long ago decided that having plenty of freezer space was a good idea so that we could stock up on frozen meats and veggies at warehouse stores, so we had a decent supply handy even though our grocery stores never really got cleaned out. We had to show the kids the joy of eating a hot dog on a slice of bread when buns were out, but it did not get much worse than that. For a long time we restricted grocery runs to once a week when possible, so we got a lot better at menu planning prior to shopping. Our closest grocery store is about four minutes from the house, so we had gotten pretty lazy about planning.

All told, the pandemic for us was a chance to spend more time together (which was mostly positive, especially with teenagers as they are) and a better appreciation for planning for bad times. So lots of positives to be found close to home.

Raptor

I learned a lot of things or I should say I relearned a lot of things.

I like to start with failures:
I had most of the things necessary including n-95 mask but little kitty litter (TP for cats) and no hand wipes. I had alcohol but not a lot of it. So the lesson there is you will ALWAYS forget something.

My businesses were deemed essential so I had everyone working and if they are working I have to be there. I will not ask someone to do something I will not do. So I have not taken a day off since Feb 2020.  :smiley_coffee:

Still in the early days before the risks were apparent I was worried about someone coming in with the bug and infecting the whole crew. So I split the office function to have 1/2 work at home remotely and the other on site. The swapped each week. We have a good IT setup and mainly use cloud functions anyway so we used Zoom & Teams to coordinate as well as email as usual.

My failure there is that we use laptops and the built in cameras and audio stink so I had to upgrade everyone with USB camera and get used to using that function. We continued this until Jan 1 2021 and then used that change as an excuse to discontinue it.

We were offered vaccines early on but I did not, do not and will not mandate that anyone get one. Not that I do not trust them just that it not my place to dictate medical treatment for people. Several jumped at the chance others chose not to. All have gotten it by now but not because I said get one.

My wife relocated to the farm and rarely came back to town. If I could have I would have done the same.

Hurricane preps are weird in 2020. My normal evac plans were stymied. I decided to play it by ear and if necessary stay for even a worst case storm. We got Zeta but thank God it not a bad storm. Just a 5 day power outage which is no problem for me. I ran the big generator the whole time. The failure there was not of my making. My regular plan was affected by the travel restrictions. The other failure was my neighbors. Many now have the air cooled Generac NG generators without any meaningful noise attenuation. It sounded like everyone was running a lawn mower 24/7 on my block and made it difficult to sleep. At my house the HVAC unit is noisier than the generator.

The biggest disappointment to me was the reaction of the populace and huge amount of bad information from all parties locally. In my state we had negative virus deaths not once not twice but five different days. What were they zombies? They were constantly "correcting" the count. After some analysis I gave up since the data was so poorly managed and reported that the stats were meaningless. This of course means that public reaction was simply ill informed panic, disinformation, misinformation and the substitution of opinion for fact. I can only imagine the reaction the next virus is small pox, cholera, TB, Ebola or some other high mortality virus.   



Now for the success:

All of my family made it safe and sound through the mess.

Yes that one item is my opinion says it all. Everything else is noise.






 
Folks you are on your own...Plan and act accordingly!

I will never claim to have all the answers. Depending upon the subject; I am also aware that I may not have all the questions much less the answers. As a result I am always willing to listen to others and work with them to arrive at the right answers to the applicable questions.

cv66er

Repeating a post from that other place...my boss had a great explanation for the whole toilet paper shortage thing...

"When Covid first occurred, if one person happened to cough, anyone around that heard it would shit themselves."


What confused me was, what happened to all the ALFREDO SAUCE?

boskone

Quote from: cv66er on June 09, 2021, 04:25:05 PM
What confused me was, what happened to all the ALFREDO SAUCE?
People bought whatever they could get their hands on.

If Alfredo sauce was what was on the shelves, that's what people bought.

Blast

My two teenagers came home from school the Friday before spring break 2020...and never saw a lot of their friends ever again. Halfway through spring break both their schools decided to close and switch to online classes. The younger daughter was in a public school 8th grade, which completely failed in transitioning to online classes and within three weeks said, "Sorry, we give up. You are on your own." Thankfully, my wife rose to the occasion of taking over her education. But she couldn't replace the missing friends and necessary social interactions.

It was my older daughter's junior year at a private high school. They absolutely knocked it out of the park in terms of switching to online classes. She was able to see and talk to her friends online but there were no sports, honor society, choir, or social dances, which was heartbreaking.

Both of them went pretty much from mid-March to August of 2020 with each other as their only source of real social interactions. It was extremely hard on both of them. Thankfully, the private school did offer both online and in-person classes this year, but still limited sports and other extra-curricular activities. About 1/2 the students came to the school, destroying old cliques (for better or worse), forcing more interactions between grades as the kids sought long-denied social interactions.

Imagine if without warning you were cut off from all your friends with a good possibility of never seeing them again. It was a serious blow to their mental development...and damn near every other kid around the world. The effects of this will be played out for a long, long time.
-Blast
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EBuff75

Preps went well (I'd stocked up before everything hit the fan last year). I'm single and live by myself, but I'm enough of an introvert that it didn't bother me all that much.  More time to read, watch movies, write, etc.. 

What is worth sharing is how things went for work.  I'm a project manager for a medium-sized software company in the automotive field. Last March, the company sent everyone home for the duration (our in-office start date isn't until September 2021).  We were fairly well set up for everyone to work from home after making some tweaks to how our VPN works.

The difficulty was with the people side of things. Doing the work hasn't been an issue (we actually had a great year last year from a business side of things), but interactions were difficult.  Fortunately, I was on a team who rose to the occasion so much so that some of the other teams are jealous of our success. 

We've spent the whole year getting to know each other better and having a lot of fun.  We have 2x weekly team meetings, which tend to be very laid back and only spend as much time talking about work-related items as is necessary.  The rest of the time is spent talking about what we're doing in our lives, showing off our pets (and kids/spouses), taking walking video tours of our houses, playing online games together, solving puzzles (one of our teammates sends out the weekly NPR challenges for us to work on), and just generally spending the time on social activities. 

The team has also gotten together IRL a few times, such as meeting at a park (where we all brought our own lunch and chair), going to a cider mill, and in a few weeks we're getting together at an ice cream place. 

The result has been that we're probably one of the closest teams in the whole company now.  One member lives in CA (the rest of us are here in the Detroit area in Michigan) and he's said that in his 12 years working for the company, this is the most he's felt like a member of a team!  In fact, we're a bit worried about keeping this sort of togetherness going once we re-enter the office in a few months. 

It's really been the 'fun' which has helped out a lot.  Yes, we still talk about work-related things, but taking that time out each week (two 30 minute meetings, one on Tues, one on Fri) has made things a lot easier for us all.  As a result, we're closer now than we were when we sat at desks right next to each other!  Life handed us lemons, and we made margaritas!  8)
Information - it's all a battle for information. You have to know what's happening if you're going to do anything about it. - Tom Clancy, Patriot Games

RoneKiln

What surprised and disappointed me was how completely unprepared any of my family were, including my father that taught me to be a paranoid luna... I mean... Prepared for any contingency.  :smiley_blink: So while I was well stocked, I ended up going into the worse of the chaos to find supplies for my large, unhealthy, unprepared family.

All I truly HAD to go find for myself was cat litter (a known weak poimt, and one I won't fix in my little 430 sq ft cottage), and popcorn. The popcorn was unforgivable. It is my #1 comfort food even before whiskey. I have no excuse for running out.

A nice surprise was how well I fared without my regular yoga classes, sauna, and massage therapy. I have a list of old injuries pages long and that's how I mitigate them. I kept up on yard work, went backpacking, and did just fine!

On the flip side, while I own all I need to stay physically fit, I clearly don't have the discipline to do so when cooped up during bad weather. I did fine during the summer when doing stuff outside. As soon as the rains rolled in though I added a little over 2 inches to my waist. Most of that's gone now the sun has come back. But it was an eye opener how much I need structured classes and activites during the winter to keep in shape.
"Seriously the most dangerous thing you are likely to do is to put salt on a Big Mac right before you eat it and to climb into your car."
--Raptor

NT2C

Quote from: RoneKiln on June 10, 2021, 12:01:09 AM
All I truly HAD to go find for myself was cat litter (a known weak poimt, and one I won't fix in my little 430 sq ft cottage), and popcorn. The popcorn was unforgivable. It is my #1 comfort food even before whiskey. I have no excuse for running out.


Since you live in a cottage you could set up a secure outside "toilet" area for your cat(s).  That has long been our plan since we have a small area where the house narrows and creates this kind of pocket between the kitchen and garage.  This adjoins our large covered front porch that's already been turned into a catio.  Closing off the end of that pocket and connecting it to the catio would be simple and give the cats an outhouse to use.


(below) The pocket area decorated for Halloween


Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto

Current Weather in My AO
Current Tracking Info for My Jeep

RoneKiln

Quote from: NT2C on June 10, 2021, 09:27:18 AM
Quote from: RoneKiln on June 10, 2021, 12:01:09 AM
All I truly HAD to go find for myself was cat litter (a known weak poimt, and one I won't fix in my little 430 sq ft cottage), and popcorn. The popcorn was unforgivable. It is my #1 comfort food even before whiskey. I have no excuse for running out.


Since you live in a cottage you could set up a secure outside "toilet" area for your cat(s).  That has long been our plan since we have a small area where the house narrows and creates this kind of pocket between the kitchen and garage.  This adjoins our large covered front porch that's already been turned into a catio.  Closing off the end of that pocket and connecting it to the catio would be simple and give the cats an outhouse to use.


(below) The pocket area decorated for Halloween




My lot is very sandy. If I really needed to, I could easily dig up some sandy soil for them to use. I lost one of my kitties recently though, and I don't think his little sister will be with me too many more years. She's really showing her age, and I'm surprised she outlived her big brother.
"Seriously the most dangerous thing you are likely to do is to put salt on a Big Mac right before you eat it and to climb into your car."
--Raptor

Crosscut

Quote from: NT2C on June 10, 2021, 09:27:18 AM
Quote from: RoneKiln on June 10, 2021, 12:01:09 AM
All I truly HAD to go find for myself was cat litter (a known weak poimt, and one I won't fix in my little 430 sq ft cottage), and popcorn. The popcorn was unforgivable. It is my #1 comfort food even before whiskey. I have no excuse for running out.


Since you live in a cottage you could set up a secure outside "toilet" area for your cat(s).  That has long been our plan since we have a small area where the house narrows and creates this kind of pocket between the kitchen and garage.  This adjoins our large covered front porch that's already been turned into a catio.  Closing off the end of that pocket and connecting it to the catio would be simple and give the cats an outhouse to use.


(below) The pocket area decorated for Halloween




catio?  Feline + patio ≠ catio, it'd be...

nevermind.

Tony D Tiger

Bug in went pretty well for me and the missus. We're both comfortable with limited "outside contact" - almost to the "get off my lawn" Grand Torino level...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NelBNtNm8l0

Maintained exercise by walking the dogs, and haven't missed going to the gym, much. Like RoneKiln though, I did miss regular visits to the LMP and chiropractor; glad both are once again available now.

Fails - well, two inconveniences - TP availability and Rx medicine (refills). TP wasn't so bad, as we never went to "Plan B" but did have to go to reserves (one ply sandpaper-like) for a short time; and the pharmacy we use was not prepared for COVID operations and only recently figured out how to do things. As they're military I can't complain much; the cost-savings are substantial... so if a seven hour "wait in your car" line is the standard, so be it.
Last time I went through the line, it was only an hour wait - hey, it's progress!
We try to keep a 90 day reserve of Rx... helps.

MPMalloy

Hey my fellow displaced ZSer's:

For me, it was much ado about nothing.  I rarely go out, I was well stocked.  The "change of command" & Derecho were *FAR* more impactful to me.

I had >0 problems with TP. :)

flybynight

This is a copy /paste of a PM I sent to a exceptional prepper friend a few months ago . ( with Opsec information removed  :smiley_bro: )

So back when this whole thing was starting. In Jan. When there were only a handful of confirmed cases wildly scattered across the country. My wife and older daughter were planning a trip to Stuttgart Germany to visit my younger daughter who had her first baby in January. They wore gloves and N-95n masks on the trip which was in the first weeks of February. While they were gone two things happened. First, I'm looking around how this thing is spreading and knew real fear. So I went full survivalist prepper. We always have several months worth of food, but it's just extra food. Stuff bought because of a good sale in anticipation of having in the normal course of life. But I went to Walmart and bought 80 pounds of rice. 80 pounds of beans, 40 pounds of other types of beans, 60 pounds of different types of flour. 20 pounds of spaghettis. 20 jars of meat and traditional Ragu. 10 small canned hams, 10 cans of chicken and 10 cans of beef. ( I think thats all of it) and then had ordered mylar bags and oxygen depleters to store all the dry goods .
The second thing that happened . My son and I got sick. Real sick . Hard to breathe , racked with aches severe coughing sick. When we went to pick up my wife I could'nt even sit up straight in the truck. My wife wanted us to go see a doctor but as bad as I felt , it was still better than several days before she came home. Within a week my wife was also very sick . But not as bad as we had been. ( she's way more healthy than us ) . So I now believe , that was covid and that it was much more widespread at that time than anyone knew.
Let's see , mid to late March Everything shut down. I was told to stay home ( with pay ) and not more than a week later my wife also because of our age and existing medical conditions. We were off til early May and then recalled back to work.
While we were off and the first few months after we went back were the worst for us. It seemed like all bad news. Everything closed ( a lot for good ) , riots, , massive out of stocks on nearly everything . The coming elections. . It was mind numbing. I have to tell you though . when the TP all disappeared I asked my wife how much we had stored cause I knew she kept a few extra in the basement/ She then showed me the 20 large containers each  of TP and Paper towels. I was never prouder of her :awesome: .
Since then we've just been plugging away. In August we finally agreed that it was safe to visit our Daughter and her family in Wichita. Got to see the grandchildren again. Things are getting better but the cost to the economy and the mental well being to our country is severely shaken from what I can see. My wife says she will probably always wear a mask when in public. So many people, businesses, jobs lost. How will this affect the children that lived through this in the future. IDK. I always liked to hink of myself as a prepper, but I never for once believed that we would face a world wide pandemic in our lifetime. But yep we survived Take care my friend.

PS I have all that mylar bagged food stored untouched in the basement so if Godzilla comes stomping around. FU you big ugly Lizard . I got beans and rice :crazy:

  Fail/ Win ?
  Wife and  I are fairly reclusive by nature. so bugging in is not a problem. With that bulk buy , stuff we normally have on hand and some other smaller bulk buys in the last couple months we are prepped for over half year if things go bad again. 
   While I have adequate  amount of ammo on hand. If the ammo situation ever returns to somewhat normal. I'M BUYING A LOT MORE. With particular attention to much more hunting  specific ammo.   With all the ammo shortage, I started buying more than  several arrows for my bows everytime I went to sporting goods/ walmart. Continue this
   Limit the amount of time/ attention to  news media .Incredibly wrong infomation reported on daily basis. Extremely dangerous to personal mental health. They are the worst  enemy to survival
"Hey idiot, you should feel your pulse, not see it."  Echo 83

CG

I've always kept a healthy stock of TP - when I was single, I'd buy the big Sam's pack when the previous one was only down to half.  Hubby, on the other hand...let's just say he gets on to me for how much of certain things I have stored.  The stock of TP was not where I wanted it.  I spent a few days buying TP every chance I could - and ended up giving away 3 packages at church on a Sunday morning because I knew we were good for at least a few weeks and some of the others weren't.  We're in one of the last areas to shut down and one of the first to open back up.  While I know people who had COVID, they all had mild cases. 

Kids never went back to school after spring break.  Last summer, we decided that no matter what happened, public school was going to be a mess that fall and got them registered for an established online public school.  The high school here was announcing on Sunday night that there wouldn't be school Monday morning, without being set up for online school for a few more days, several different times.  The kids do miss SOME of the social interaction, but they also like the lack of drama. :panic:

At this point, we're pretty much back to pre-COVID normal in our area.  No social distancing at church.  Still working on less germy ways to do communion.  Kids are opting to stay in online school, but that might change once one of them graduates next year.  Luckily, our income never took a major hit - hubby's job did reduce some of his benefits, and his pay for a little while, but I'd started stashing as soon as things started going south instead of continuing to pay off things, so that helped a lot.  We need to rebuild our buffer, but we'll make it through.

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