It didn't shit the bed, but it did piss the floor

Started by NT2C, September 05, 2023, 09:33:55 AM

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roadart

for the pan, i had to make one for one of my old rental unit. a trip to buy sheet metal, formed around a 2x4 soldered up the corners, only cost n hour and 6 bucks
surviving is not good enough

MacWa77ace

Quote from: NT2C on September 11, 2023, 07:43:53 AM
Quote from: Asparagus on September 11, 2023, 07:29:43 AMWell, I've never even heard of a plastic hot water tank! Stainless steel is more expensive for sure, but maybe even more so over there? A standard brand name 200L 2000w stainless hot water tank is around 800-1000$ here, a non stainless unknown brand equivalent is around 500-600$ (if you can even find one).
Here's a plastic example.  We almost bought this one: Rheem 50 gallon plastic

It's still got metal fittings and metal elements and therefor probably a zinc anode.

When you first said plastic I thought you meant the tank part, and the tank part of mine is fiberglass, even though the outside and everything else is metal.

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DarkAxel

Quote from: Asparagus on September 11, 2023, 12:57:13 AMCan you get stainless steel water heaters over there? They are the standard here, and the tanks themself never fail. Heating elements, thermostats and safety valves do thought, but they are replaceable. Expected lifetime of water heaters here is 20 years, but they easily last 40 if taken care of. I really recommend a stainless tank if you can get one!

I replaced my water heater from 2007 in february before i moved in, turns out the old one was so full of deposits from the hard water that the safety valve was stuck shut and one heating element had burned out. Replaced it with a new one since the old was a less common make and hard to get parts for, new one i can maintain better and replace anything that can break. Hoping it will last me a good long time with some regular maintenance!

As NT2C said, stainless tanks are crazy expensive and rare. The high quality counterparts in the states are glass lined, though those are starting to get rare too. I can still find them at my local plumbing supply store. Stainless tanks are special order here in my area.

MacWa77ace

Plastic sided radiators and plastic coolant fittings in cars don't last long, makes sense to make the home hot water heaters out of plastic too, then charge the same as fiberglass tank and metal housing heaters that last 15 years, but reduce their working life by 2/3.

Sort of like how icecream gets nerfed by reducing the size container but charging the same amount.
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NT2C

Quote from: MacWa77ace on September 12, 2023, 09:21:58 AM
Quote from: NT2C on September 11, 2023, 07:43:53 AM
Quote from: Asparagus on September 11, 2023, 07:29:43 AMWell, I've never even heard of a plastic hot water tank! Stainless steel is more expensive for sure, but maybe even more so over there? A standard brand name 200L 2000w stainless hot water tank is around 800-1000$ here, a non stainless unknown brand equivalent is around 500-600$ (if you can even find one).
Here's a plastic example.  We almost bought this one: Rheem 50 gallon plastic

It's still got metal fittings and metal elements and therefor probably a zinc anode.

When you first said plastic I thought you meant the tank part, and the tank part of mine is fiberglass, even though the outside and everything else is metal.


Still going to have the zinc anode regardless of what the tank and components are made of.  Just water flowing through it is enough to induce a slight current, and unless all the house plumbing is changed to non-metallic components you'll likely still have galvanic corrosion.

Reminds me of the spate of Chrysler water pumps that were going bad due to corrosion back in the 90s.  Turned out the hose manufacturer had changed the amount of carbon black used in the rubber, which was enough to induce galvanic corrosion of the pumps, heater cores, and radiators.
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majorhavoc

Quote from: NT2C on September 12, 2023, 05:23:03 PM
Quote from: MacWa77ace on September 12, 2023, 09:21:58 AM
Quote from: NT2C on September 11, 2023, 07:43:53 AM
Quote from: Asparagus on September 11, 2023, 07:29:43 AMWell, I've never even heard of a plastic hot water tank! Stainless steel is more expensive for sure, but maybe even more so over there? A standard brand name 200L 2000w stainless hot water tank is around 800-1000$ here, a non stainless unknown brand equivalent is around 500-600$ (if you can even find one).
Here's a plastic example.  We almost bought this one: Rheem 50 gallon plastic

It's still got metal fittings and metal elements and therefor probably a zinc anode.

When you first said plastic I thought you meant the tank part, and the tank part of mine is fiberglass, even though the outside and everything else is metal.


Still going to have the zinc anode regardless of what the tank and components are made of.  Just water flowing through it is enough to induce a slight current, and unless all the house plumbing is changed to non-metallic components you'll likely still have galvanic corrosion.

Reminds me of the spate of Chrysler water pumps that were going bad due to corrosion back in the 90s.  Turned out the hose manufacturer had changed the amount of carbon black used in the rubber, which was enough to induce galvanic corrosion of the pumps, heater cores, and radiators.
It must have you, NT2C, about 5 years ago on the old ZS forums who warned me about the zinc anode in my water heater when the metal plug that was part of the heating element rusted out.  You said that likely meant the anode had eroded away and you were correct.  When I reported that the anode had almost completely dissolved, you also correctly predicted that the inner walls of the water heater was probably badly corroded too and the rest of the water heater wouldn't last long.  I got it back up and running with a new element and anode, but it only lasted another year or so before completely rusting through.

Before that I didn't even know water heaters had anodes. 
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MacWa77ace

Ships have zinc anodes also. Large 'bricks' attached to the outsides, below the waterline.





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Raptor

All boats with an inboard engine will also have sacrificial zinc or aluminum anodes if they want to prevent galavantic corrosion. They will be on shafts, props and even heat exchangers in fresh water cooled engines and HVAC units.

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