long time lurker

Started by tirls, April 19, 2022, 05:30:07 PM

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tirls

Greetings!

I used to lurk on the old forum for a couple of years and somehow found my way here. I´ll try to post some this time around although I´m unsure how much worthwhile I can contribute.
It´s already one more post then the last time, so it´s a start.  :)

EBuff75

Glad to have you!  And one is infinitely greater than zero, so you're already ahead!  :smiley_clap:
Information - it's all a battle for information. You have to know what's happening if you're going to do anything about it. - Tom Clancy, Patriot Games

Moab

Welcome. :)

Post a question? :)
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

majorhavoc

Welcome.  What about telling us a bit about yourself?  If you lurked for a couple of years, what attracted you to ZS?  Prepping?  Zombies?
A post-apocalyptic tale of love, loss and redemption. And zombies!<br />https://ufozs.com/smf/index.php?topic=105.0

NapalmMan67

Welcome.  Post a question on anything, any question, in a new thread, so MOAB doesn't loose his sanity.   :smiley_knipoog:
Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc-  Not just pretty words.

Moab

Quote from: NapalmMan67 on April 20, 2022, 05:07:09 PMWelcome.  Post a question on anything, any question, in a new thread, so MOAB doesn't loose his sanity.  :smiley_knipoog:
Lmao! :)
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

tirls

I found the old forum through some googly search for self sufficent living. At that time I tried to plant most of my own vegetables on a tiny 2m² balkony. Since then we´ve got ourselves a garden and I plan to start dabbling in permaculture.
I am quite into historical crafts and ancient engineering but neolithic tools might be a bit too much TEOTWAWKI.

I do enjoy zombie films though, the lower the production quality the better.

NT2C

Glad you were able to follow us over here.  I think you'll fit in well with this band of merry maniacs.  :smiley_blink:
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto
Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles
Current Weather in My AO

majorhavoc

Quote from: tirls on April 25, 2022, 01:54:57 PMI found the old forum through some googly search for self sufficent living. At that time I tried to plant most of my own vegetables on a tiny 2m² balkony. Since then we´ve got ourselves a garden and I plan to start dabbling in permaculture.
I am quite into historical crafts and ancient engineering but neolithic tools might be a bit too much TEOTWAWKI.

I do enjoy zombie films though, the lower the production quality the better.
We have both a subforum on Gardening and Farming and a sub-board on Apartment and Tiny Home Prepping under the Sheltering in Place subforum.  Either would be a great place to discuss gardening on a balcony.  I think at least one member of this forum lives in an apartment building and mentioned growing vegetables on a balcony.  It's possible I'm remembering that from the old ZS forums.  But that would be great subject to discuss here.  Remember: you don't have to be an expert on the topic to start a thread.  Sometimes it's just a general question about the subject can prompt really interesting and useful discussions.   
A post-apocalyptic tale of love, loss and redemption. And zombies!<br />https://ufozs.com/smf/index.php?topic=105.0

CG

Quote from: tirls on April 25, 2022, 01:54:57 PMI found the old forum through some googly search for self sufficent living. At that time I tried to plant most of my own vegetables on a tiny 2m² balkony. Since then we´ve got ourselves a garden and I plan to start dabbling in permaculture.
I am quite into historical crafts and ancient engineering but neolithic tools might be a bit too much TEOTWAWKI.

I do enjoy zombie films though, the lower the production quality the better.
Any recommendation for books on neolithic tools?  I remember being fascinated in my Ancient Sci & Tech class, but can't remember what the textbook was (and it got sold).

Moab

Quote from: CG on April 26, 2022, 03:59:40 PM
Quote from: tirls on April 25, 2022, 01:54:57 PMI found the old forum through some googly search for self sufficent living. At that time I tried to plant most of my own vegetables on a tiny 2m² balkony. Since then we´ve got ourselves a garden and I plan to start dabbling in permaculture.
I am quite into historical crafts and ancient engineering but neolithic tools might be a bit too much TEOTWAWKI.

I do enjoy zombie films though, the lower the production quality the better.
Any recommendation for books on neolithic tools?  I remember being fascinated in my Ancient Sci & Tech class, but can't remember what the textbook was (and it got sold).
I don't know of any books. But i have never looked. You should post this as a new thread under edged weapons.

My father was Indian. And used to mess around with flint napping alot. Alot of the old west/trapper meets held around the US feature alot of this same type of tool making. Not neolithic per se. But it may have been handed down since.

At these meets they trade and sell such tools. Some of it can command a good price. But the fun is in learning how to make them. Alot of teaching goes on at these meets as well.

My family is Yakama Indian. Every year they hold the Omak Stampede. Where natives and non natives race horses over this cliff. Its crazy. But the event goes on for days. And there are a ton of booths with flint napped(i may be spelling that wrong.) Tools. Also people teaching it and selling supplies to use. 

My father had a small collection of knives made this way. But i dont know what happened to them after he died.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

tirls

As soon as I try a longer answer I always get  

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tirls

One more try without the links:

I just wrote a multiple page essay only to realize you might only be looking for some book titles for casual reading 😊
So here goes the "short" version:

I like to go by the different civilizations or areas and look for books and information specific about them. I´ve yet to find a good book that encompasses all the different cultures, ages and areas and still contain more than basic information. What this method won´t give you is a comparison to correctly identify certain objects, e.g. the different shapes of arrowheads or adzes that are typical for certain cultures and time periods. Those things I usually search on the internet.

Most of my books are not in English and I think most are out of print. In addition, I like museum brochures, as they tend to have nice quality pictures. The publisher Springer is also a good source for well researched books. Just be careful they also have research papers and articles up. If you know someone with a university email address you used to be able to get a lot of their eBooks for free but I don´t know if it still applies.

I recently read Stone Tools in the Paleolithic and Neolithic Near East by John Shea – the author has a couple of others on the theme - which was quite good, but the printed version is ridiculously expensive and the eBook version doesn´t seem to have as nice illustrations which I find important. Or maybe it was just my computer going on a strike. There is one chapter up online on Cambridge.org about the basic techniques on how to create flintstone tools if you´re interested (Lithics Basics).

Academia.edu has some great free sources.
A lot of pester and mortars but also Neolithic beer brewing: Plant Food Processing at Göbekli Tepe which is something different from the usual knives and axes you usually read about.
There are also some really nice experiments with stone age axes on academia.edu by Wulf Hein, but I think most of them are in German. He does have some videos though. It´s interesting seeing the different techniques used for felling compared to modern ones.

Aaand this might still have been more information than you were looking for. If you wanted a couple of book titles with nice images to browse through that focus solely on Neolithic tools written in English: I don´t have any, sorry :D

NT2C

It was the URLs causing the issue.  When a newbie posts a message it gets extra scrutiny to detect spam, and the system can be overzealous at times.  I made a little modification to your account that should fix that.
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto
Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles
Current Weather in My AO

tirls

Thank you, whatever you did it worked, I simply edited the links in afterwards. I just hope the couple of tries beforehand don´t suddenly show up  :-[

Moab

Quote from: tirls on May 06, 2022, 02:45:02 PMOne more try without the links:

I just wrote a multiple page essay only to realize you might only be looking for some book titles for casual reading 😊
So here goes the "short" version:

I like to go by the different civilizations or areas and look for books and information specific about them. I´ve yet to find a good book that encompasses all the different cultures, ages and areas and still contain more than basic information. What this method won´t give you is a comparison to correctly identify certain objects, e.g. the different shapes of arrowheads or adzes that are typical for certain cultures and time periods. Those things I usually search on the internet.

Most of my books are not in English and I think most are out of print. In addition, I like museum brochures, as they tend to have nice quality pictures. The publisher Springer is also a good source for well researched books. Just be careful they also have research papers and articles up. If you know someone with a university email address you used to be able to get a lot of their eBooks for free but I don´t know if it still applies.

I recently read Stone Tools in the Paleolithic and Neolithic Near East by John Shea – the author has a couple of others on the theme - which was quite good, but the printed version is ridiculously expensive and the eBook version doesn´t seem to have as nice illustrations which I find important. Or maybe it was just my computer going on a strike. There is one chapter up online on Cambridge.org about the basic techniques on how to create flintstone tools if you´re interested (Lithics Basics).

Academia.edu has some great free sources.
A lot of pester and mortars but also Neolithic beer brewing: Plant Food Processing at Göbekli Tepe which is something different from the usual knives and axes you usually read about.
There are also some really nice experiments with stone age axes on academia.edu by Wulf Hein, but I think most of them are in German. He does have some videos though. It´s interesting seeing the different techniques used for felling compared to modern ones.

Aaand this might still have been more information than you were looking for. If you wanted a couple of book titles with nice images to browse through that focus solely on Neolithic tools written in English: I don´t have any, sorry :D
Very interesting. Please stick around. I'm loving your posts. 🌝
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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