Author Topic: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?  (Read 58 times)

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Offline Crosscut

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Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« on: July 14, 2021, 10:46:48 AM »
I've been stocking antibiotics (fish/bird varieties mostly, and only those sold in capsule or tablet form) since just before Y2k.  Prices have gone up considerably over that time, use to get most of them for $8 - $20 per 100 back then, so I did some homework and decided one from each of the antibiotic classes (penicillins, tetracyclines, macrolides, etc) made sense and $100 or so every 5-7 years to replace them wasn't unreasonable.  With their cost now, and that I've disposed of literally thousands of expired pills over that time, decided to pare back the number to stock to maybe 4 types.  No specific type of PAW envisioned for planning purposes, just which would cover the most likely infections we might have to deal with in a long term post-disaster situation.

Think I have my first 3 decided:

1) Doxycycline

Penicillin allergic person in the core team, and Doxy is a common second-line choice for many infections where the 'cillins would otherwise be prescribed.  Activity against tick-borne diseases (Lyme/RMSF). A good number of the likely biowarfare agents including anthrax, plague, Q fever, typhus, tularemia, and brucellosis.  Some STDs (not a concern here, but young people will be young people).  Pneumonia.  Dental infections. Traveller's diarrhea, although I read that resistance to doxy is growing. 

2) Cephalexin

Uncomplicated cellulitis.  Upper respiratory, ear, and urinary tract infections.  We use this semi-regularly for our dogs, from occasional fights with other dogs, to injuries from running in the woods (stick stabs, etc), and following a porcupine "quill-ectomy".

3) Metronidazole

Anaerobic bacteria, and some amoebas (like dysentery) and protozoa (like giardia). Abscesses. Tetanus. Combined with Doxycycline for human or animal bite wounds.

4) Undecided.  Still think one from a different class than the 3 above makes the most sense and thinking either ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, clindamycin, or possibly Augmentin (amoxicillin+clavulanate). 

If you stock any, or are considering it, which one(s) and why?

Offline Raptor

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Re: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2021, 01:12:02 PM »
One of the issues and why I stopped stocking these is that their effectiveness seems to wane faster due to adaptation of "bugs" than their shelf life.

That said I do stock:

zeniquin but mainly for animal care. It seems to be the go to drug for animal skin abscesses like cat bites etc. My DVM has no problem providing it lawfully to me so that is a consideration.

Ciprofloxacin for use in humans mainly due to the fact it seems to be rx of choice prescribed by my MD and thus easy to obtain.
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Offline RoneKiln

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Re: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2021, 01:33:02 AM »
Most of my life I've been prone to sinus infections during allergy season, and these easily evolve into lung infections for me. I have always, my entire life, responded very well to simple penicillin based drugs. When Covid looked like it might reach the US on a large scale, and I realized how much of our pharmaceuticals came from a country already in lockdown from Covid, I ordered vet grade penicillin and a common non penicillin antibiotic. I'm confident in penicillin, but I wanted an option for fighting anything resilient to penicillin or for someone that might be allergic to penicillin.

Since ordering them I have discovered I no longer struggle with seasonal allergies. So sinus and lung infections don't appear to be the same risk for me they used to be.
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Re: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2021, 08:14:59 AM »
One of the issues and why I stopped stocking these is that their effectiveness seems to wane faster due to adaptation of "bugs" than their shelf life.

That said I do stock:

zeniquin but mainly for animal care. It seems to be the go to drug for animal skin abscesses like cat bites etc. My DVM has no problem providing it lawfully to me so that is a consideration.

Ciprofloxacin for use in humans mainly due to the fact it seems to be rx of choice prescribed by my MD and thus easy to obtain.

Ciprofloxicin is high on my list (along with clindamycin) as the fourth choice, it's good for bone and joint infections and for intra abdominal infections if combined with the metronidazole.  It's also the first-line choice for many of the biowarfare diseases where Doxy is the alternate choice, and it seems likely that a nation-state level biowarfare program would develop/engineer bacteria resistant to at least one of antibiotics normally used to treat it (if not both). 

Most of my life I've been prone to sinus infections during allergy season, and these easily evolve into lung infections for me. I have always, my entire life, responded very well to simple penicillin based drugs. When Covid looked like it might reach the US on a large scale, and I realized how much of our pharmaceuticals came from a country already in lockdown from Covid, I ordered vet grade penicillin and a common non penicillin antibiotic. I'm confident in penicillin, but I wanted an option for fighting anything resilient to penicillin or for someone that might be allergic to penicillin.

Since ordering them I have discovered I no longer struggle with seasonal allergies. So sinus and lung infections don't appear to be the same risk for me they used to be.

But that's a good plan IMO, double up on different antibiotics used for treating something you know you're at higher risk for.  It also highlights part of my dilemma, focus on multiple options to treat the most likely or common infections or expand the breadth of what it might be possible to treat?  Make doubly sure that pneumonia and dental infections are covered, or chose one that might give you a fighting chance for a compound fracture or penetrating abdominal trauma (as examples)?

Offline TACAIR

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Re: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2021, 09:56:49 AM »
I would very strongly suggest that if you decide to stock what would normally be a prescription drug  (of any kind) that you purchase a paper copy of the Physician's Desk Reference Guide .  Used volumes can be had in fine condition for under $50.  Check on line, buy from reputable sellers.

These have dose guidelines and lists of possible side effects. 



the life you save may be your own - prescription drugs are controlled for a reason.
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Offline Crosscut

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Re: Antibiotics for the PAW, which one(s) and why?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2021, 02:37:28 PM »
I would very strongly suggest that if you decide to stock what would normally be a prescription drug  (of any kind) that you purchase a paper copy of the Physician's Desk Reference Guide .  Used volumes can be had in fine condition for under $50.  Check on line, buy from reputable sellers.

These have dose guidelines and lists of possible side effects. 



the life you save may be your own - prescription drugs are controlled for a reason.

Agreed.  Merck manual, Sanford Guide to Antimicrobial Therapy, and The Harriet Lane Handbook if there's kids in the group might be good ideas too.  And a medical dictionary!  Some teaching hospitals have their empiric antibiotic guides online and those can be good references too.  I store most of it electronically, mostly due to cost rather than by choice, but I do try to get hardcopies of the most important ones but they get dated (although not necessarily useless) pretty quickly.  My hardcopy PDR is a 1990 version.

 

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